An old wine pitcher for over 1,600 years, no scientist dared to open it very curious

An ancient Speyer wine bottle found in a Roman aristocrat dating to about 1,650 years has led scientists to constantly debate whether or not to open it for years.

An ancient Speyer wine bottle found in a Roman aristocrat dating to about 1,650 years has led scientists to constantly debate whether or not to open it for years.

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An old wine pitcher for over 1,600 years, no scientist dared to open it very curious Picture 1
An old 1650-year-old wine bottle is on display in a museum in Germany.(Photo: Twitter).

In 1867, while excavating the fourth-century tomb of a Roman aristocrat near the city of Speyer, scientists discovered 16 glass jars inside the tomb. There is only one bottle intact.

Currently, wine jars dating back to 1650 years are on display at the Palatinate Museum of History, Speyer, Germany. For many years, scientists still argue strongly about whether or not to open this ancient wine.

According to the scientists, the 1.5-liter blue-green glass jar is made from around 325 to 350 in the dolphin-shaped straps. It is rated as the oldest wine in the world. The solution inside the bottle is split into two separate parts, the top is a golden brown mixture like colofan resin, the bottom of the bottle is a clear liquid layer. Since its production, the bottle has been sealed with beeswax.

An old wine pitcher for over 1,600 years, no scientist dared to open it very curious Picture 2

In the ancient tomb, this wine jar has two bones containing a skeleton of a male and a female. According to scientists, the man may be a famous Roman aristocrat, and the pitcher of wine is prepared for the journey to this man's heaven.

Though very curious, so far no scientist who dared to open an antique wine bottle tightened the lid for more than 1600 years.

During World War II, a chemist tried to analyze the bottle but did not open it. Many experts suspect that the alcohol inside is no longer suitable for drinking because it has been left for too long even though the alcohol makes it even longer. Microbiologists think that opening a bottle can destroy alcohol inside.

According to Ludger Tekampe, the museum's wine assessor, "Can we not be sure that alcohol can withstand shock when exposed to air?"

Monika Christman, a wine professor, said that in terms of microbiology, wine in this ancient vase is likely to not be broken, but it will no longer stimulate the taste.

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